Posts Tagged ‘Youth’

February 7, 2017 · by pcriadmin · Featured, PCRI

Takara 02PCRI awarded two new laptop computers to school-age youth living in PCRI housing at the beginning of February 2017. The two laptops were gifted to PCRI by Comcast at a late-2016 event providing information about Comcast’s Internet Essentials program. After receiving the computers, PCRI invited youth to submit letters describing how they would benefit from having a new computer. While PCRI received many deserving submissions, two winners stood out:

If it wasn’t already evident in Takara’s letter that she loves to read and write, it quickly became obvious when she came into PCRI’s office to pick up her new laptop. Her face lit up when she described what she would be able to learn and write on her new computer.

Takara 09Similarly, her mother Tiffany beamed as Takara talked about the focus areas of the IB program and how she had earned bracelets for each of the program areas, including thinking critically, taking risks, caring, being open-minded and more. IB schools encourage students outside of the basic common core lessons “by developing inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who are motivated to succeed.”

Another youth picked up his new laptop from PCRI’s Maya Angelou Community Center.

“I have attended the Maya Angelou Community Center ever since it first opened,” wrote Joseph, age 14. “Since that time, I have usually used the center’s computers for homework, but now that I am in high school, by the time I get home the center is either closed or ten minutes to close. Never enough time.”

Joseph with New ComputerJoseph’s letter went on to describe how having a new computer would help him and both of his brothers with their studies and completing homework. Joseph was beyond happy when Resident Services Coordinator Adrena Christmas delivered the news that he had won the new laptop. His immediate response was that Ms. Adrena (as he calls her) was tricking him, but once he realized it wasn’t a joke, he thanked Adrena and PCRI over and over again for allowing him such a great opportunity.

“My teachers would usually assign work that needs to be on Google classroom, I cannot do it without a computer or internet capable device,” Joseph said. “My mother has tried hard to get one, but she never could afford to buy one. This computer will help me so much. My papers will be turned in on time, it will also give me something to do over the weekends.”

Since receiving his new laptop, Adrena remarked that Joseph has been in to the community center every day to work on it and she has noticed him become much more in tune with completing his homework.

“I will work as hard as I can to keep my grades up by using the device,” he wrote in his letter. “I will graduate by keeping my grades up by using the laptop that I am hoping to win.”

All of the staff members who read Takara’s and Joseph’s letters congratulate them on their new computers. PCRI staff look forward to reading more of Takara’s writing and seeing Joseph graduate in a few years from Grant High School.

About the Comcast Internet Essentials Program
Working side-by-side with schools, government, and non-profit partners, Comcast has connected more than 750,000 families—over 3 million low-income Americans—to the power of the Internet in their homes. This program has grown to be Comcast’s largest and most successful community investment initiative. Since 2011, Comcast has built a network of over 2,000 volunteers and over 9,000 non-profit and educator partners to help spread the word about Internet Essentials. All told, Comcast has provided more than $300 million of support for digital literacy training, benefiting over 4.4 million people.

February 20, 2015 · by pcriadmin · PCRI

PCRI invites all Park Terrace and PCRI youth to join us as we explore new foods and learn new skills in the kitchen! The first meeting of PCRI’s Youth Cooking Club will be on Monday, February 23rd from 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm.

Maya Cooking ClubThe cooking club is open to all PCRI youth. And activities at this first meeting, will include decorating aprons, discussing safety in the kitchen, and learning to read a recipe card. We will also be making a delicious snack!

Youth must sign up to join and participate. If your child is interested in participating, please sign up by emailing Karissa, coming by Park Terrace Community Center, or calling the center at 503-282-1359. All youth who participate will receive their own apron to keep!

Interested in lending a hand? Contact Karissa to express your interest in volunteering with the Cooking Club!

September 2, 2014 · by pcriadmin · Featured, PCRI

IMG_1712For two weeks in August, PCRI hosted the Maya Angelou Summer Youth Arts Camp, giving youth ages 5-18 an opportunity to use their imaginations and express their creativity while building character and confidence.

The annual camp has a different focus each year.  For 2014, youth created and starred in a puppet play, thanks to help from Oregon Children’s Theater.  Instructor and award-winning actor James Sharinghousen worked with camp participants to develop skills from acting and dance to learning to keep their attention focused.

While Sharinghousen worked with the youth on their theater skills, Resident Services Coordinator Jessie Blanchard helped youth create puppets and props for the camp’s play and provided additional motivation and support to ensure the youth’s success at the camp.

“It was amazing to see the transformation of the youth as they worked as a team to build a 20-minute play,” Blanchard said.  “I was proud of them sticking with the performance, no mater how intimidating performing can be.  After the final performance, the youth had gained a sense of pride from performing a show that the audience thoroughly enjoyed.”

IMG_1746Blanchard added that the camp participants got to take home the puppets they made at the camp, continuing their interest in storytelling.  Each youth also graduated the camp with a t-shirt which they decorated while learning how to screen print.

The Maya Angelou Art Camp was started in 2004 by a community member as a free summer program for the children at the Maya Angelou Apartments and the surrounding neighborhood. After supporting the camp for several years, PCRI recently incorporated the camp into regular programming at the Maya Angelou Community Center.  The Maya Angelou Art Camp, as well as PCRI’s Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) Camp provide opportunities for growth and development for youth residing in PCRI housing and the surrounding community who typically lack access to summer programs and healthy foods outside of school.

 

September 2, 2014 · by pcriadmin · Featured, PCRI

IMG_1712For two weeks in August, PCRI hosted the Maya Angelou Summer Youth Arts Camp, giving youth ages 5-18 an opportunity to use their imaginations and express their creativity while building character and confidence.

The annual camp has a different focus each year.  For 2014, youth created and starred in a puppet play, thanks to help from Oregon Children’s Theater.  Instructor and award-winning actor James Sharinghousen worked with camp participants to develop skills from acting and dance to learning to keep their attention focused.

While Sharinghousen worked with the youth on their theater skills, Resident Services Coordinator Jessie Blanchard helped youth create puppets and props for the camp’s play and provided additional motivation and support to ensure the youth’s success at the camp.

“It was amazing to see the transformation of the youth as they worked as a team to build a 20-minute play,” Blanchard said.  “I was proud of them sticking with the performance, no mater how intimidating performing can be.  After the final performance, the youth had gained a sense of pride from performing a show that the audience thoroughly enjoyed.”

IMG_1746Blanchard added that the camp participants got to take home the puppets they made at the camp, continuing their interest in storytelling.  Each youth also graduated the camp with a t-shirt which they decorated while learning how to screen print.

The Maya Angelou Art Camp was started in 2004 by a community member as a free summer program for the children at the Maya Angelou Apartments and the surrounding neighborhood. After supporting the camp for several years, PCRI recently incorporated the camp into regular programming at the Maya Angelou Community Center.  The Maya Angelou Art Camp, as well as PCRI’s Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) Camp provide opportunities for growth and development for youth residing in PCRI housing and the surrounding community who typically lack access to summer programs and healthy foods outside of school.

 

July 15, 2014 · by pcriadmin · Featured, PCRI

PCRI is pleased to announce that we have been chosen as one of 30 select organizations to participate in United Way of the Columbia-Willamette’s new Community Strengthening collaborative cohort designed to improve outcomes for low-income children and their families, and ultimately break the cycle of childhood poverty in the four-county (Clackamas, Clark, Multnomah and Washington) region.

UW LogoThe collaborative cohort, which is based on the “collective impact” approach, is part of United Way of the Columbia-Willamette’s new strategic direction to leverage the expertise, resources, and effort of multiple organizations across the region in working together toward one common goal: breaking the cycle of childhood poverty.

United Way’s Community Strengthening cohort is comprised of 30 emerging and established non-profits serving low income and culturally specific communities across the metropolitan area. The cohort will work together for a period of three years (July 2014 through June 2017) to create and participate in learning communities designed to share experiences, exchange data and information, and build collective knowledge around new and promising practices to improve outcomes for low-income families and their children. Each member of the Community Strengthening cohort will be awarded up to $50,000 per year, to complete this critical work. (*Funding to PCRI and the other non-profits in the cohort is contingent on the funding United Way receives as an organization to its Breaking the Cycle fund.)

Each non-profit organization participating in United Way of the Columbia-Willamette’s Community Strengthening cohort has agreed to share their results through a common measurement framework, to work together on critical problems and innovations in the field, and to build a common knowledge base about collective impact on childhood poverty in our region.

“We are ecstatic to be collaborating with the outstanding organizations selected to be a part of our Community Strengthening cohort on breaking the cycle of childhood poverty. The issue of poverty is incredibly complex, with multiple facets; it’s a far greater issue than any one organization can resolve alone,” said Keith Thomajan, CEO of United Way of the Columbia-Willamette. “In utilizing the collective impact model, we are confident we can amplify and accelerate the impact we are making in our community specific to student success, family stability, and connected communities to give every child, regardless of their socioeconomic status, a fair chance at success. Quite simply, we are better together.”

The Collective Impact Model

The collective impact model, as articulated by the non-profit consulting group Foundation Strategy Group (FSG), is a model of work that brings people together, in a structured way, to achieve social change. There are five conditions** of “collective impact” that lead to meaningful results:

A common agenda: All participants have a shared vision for change including a common understanding of the problem and a joint approach to solving it through agreed upon actions

  1. Shared Measurement: Collecting data and measuring results consistently across all participants ensures efforts remain aligned and participants hold each other accountable
    1. Mutually Reinforcing Activities: Participant activities must be differentiated while still being coordinated through a mutually reinforcing plan of action
    2. Continuous Communication: Consistent and open communication is needed across the many players to build trust, assure mutual objectives, and appreciate common motivation
  • Backbone Organization: Creating and managing collective impact requires a separate organization(s) with staff and a specific set of skills to serve as the backbone for the entire initiative and coordinate participating organizations and agencies (The backbone organization for the Community Strengthening strategy is United Way of the Columbia-Willamette.)

 

**Source: Foundation Strategy Group (FSG) http://www.fsg.org/OurApproach/CollectiveImpact.aspx

To learn more about United Way’s Community Strengthening strategy and the other organizations involved in the cohort, please visit http://www.unitedway-pdx.org/community-strengthening-investments

June 5, 2014 · by Staff · Featured, PCRI

From July 14 to July 25, 2014, PCRI’s Park Terrace Community Center will be abuzz with the Healthy Eating, Active Living (HEAL) Camp.  The two-week camp teaches youth the importance of staying active and making healthy eating choices–and empowers them to put those lessons into practice.  The HEAL camp is free for PCRI residents, but is open to other youth with tuition based on a sliding scale based on family income.

Heal Camp 1The 2014 camp builds on the success of prior years.  Youth will learn dance from a variety of instructors–everything from Hip Hop to Belly Dancing (keeping it age-appropriate, of course).  Adding to their dance skills, camp participants will create an animated video Youth will also benefit from cooking classes and by making smoothies from berries they pick themselves. As with prior years, the food prepared by youth in the camp will be combined into a cookbook (check back for those recipes!). Adding to their dance and cooking skills, camp participants will also create an animated video about the camp’s activities.

Prior years’ participants have learned valuable skills in Ninja School, discovered new favorites visiting local farms, and had fun learning about food and gardening while making seed bombs.  Classes will be held at Park Terrace Community Center and Maya Angelou Community Center Monday through Friday from July 14-18 and July 21-25, 2014.

For more information, to register, or to learn more about sliding-scale tuition, please contact Jessie Blanchard, Resident Services Coordinator at PCRI, by e-mail or at (503) 287-4009.  Registration and consent forms must be received by PCRI no later than June 20, 2014 to confirm enrollment in the camp.

Want to Help?

Our camps depend on support and donations of the community!

We are specifically looking for gift cards for snacks, and donations of gardening supplies for the activities, as well as monetary donations to help cover the expense of professional staff members who will lead organized classes.  Donations can be made online HERE.

June 5, 2014 · by Staff · Featured, PCRI

PCRI is excited to host the annual Maya Angelou Summer Youth Arts Camp for youth ages 5-18.  The two-week camp is a highly anticipated opportunity for youth to use their imaginations and express their creativity in a supportive environment that builds character and confidence.  The arts camp is free for PCRI residents, but is open to other youth with tuition based on a sliding scale based on family income.

Maya Arts Camp 2011For 2014, the Maya Angelou Arts Camp will give youth a chance to be their star of their own puppet play.  Instructors from Oregon Children’s Theater will guide youth through the process of creating the puppets and the play.  The camp will be held August 11-15 and August 18-22, 2014 and will culminate in a showcase performance on August 22, 2014.

In addition to the puppet play, the two-week camp will feature projects from different art disciplines involving various media.  Prior art camp projects included murals, painted chairs, mosaics and other activities.

The Maya Angelou Art Camp was started in 2004 by a community member as a free summer program for the children at the Maya Angelou Apartments and the surrounding neighborhood. After supporting the camp for several years, PCRI recently incorporated the camp into regular programming at the Maya Angelou Community Center.  The Maya Angelou Art Camp, as well as PCRI’s Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) Camp provide opportunities for growth and development for youth residing in PCRI housing and the surrounding community who typically lack access to summer programs and healthy foods outside of school.

For more information, to register, or to learn more about sliding-scale tuition, please contact Jessie Blanchard, Resident Services Coordinator at PCRI by e-mail or at (503) 287-4009.  Registration and consent forms must be received by PCRI no later than July 5, 2014 to confirm enrollment in the camp.

Want to Help?

Our camps depend on support and donations of the community!

We are specifically looking for gift cards for snacks, and donations of art supplies for the activities, as well as monetary donations to go toward paying for professional staff members who will lead organized classes.  Donations can be made online HERE.

April 16, 2014 · by Staff · Featured, PCRI

The Urban League of Portland’s

2014 Summer Youth Employment Programs

Science camp at Gunderson

 

Applications for the Urban League of Portland’s 2014 Summer Youth Programs are available now online and at the Urban League offices at 10 N Russell Street.


The Urban League of Portland’s Youth Programs serve to shepherd the youth in our community and empower them to achieve. We foster interactive academic and real-world experiences that help students develop leadership, life and social skills, self-esteem, and cultural pride. Urban League Youth programs are designed to: prepare youth to be successful; encourage them to pursue post secondary education; and exposes them to career options.

Learn more about the Urban League of Portland’s Summer Youth Programs & download applications:

 

Thanks to the generosity of Comcast the Urban League of Portland is able to offer these programs free of charge to youth.

The Summer Youth Employment Programs for High School students and young adults ages 18-25 are four week summer programs designed to: prepare African American youth for entering the realm of employment; positively impact high school completion; encourage and prepare youth to pursue a college education, apprenticeship or career focused training.

Additionally, High School students and young adults ages 18-25 have the opportunity to volunteer as Camp Counselors at this year’s 4-H Summer Camp. This is a great opportunity to gain work experience, enjoy the outdoors, develop leadership skills, and give back to the community. Applications can be found online here, and at the Urban League of Portland offices at 10 N Russell.

Questions? 

Please contact Susan Johnson
503.280.2600 ext.620
SJohnson@ulpdx.org 

 

August 2, 2013 · by Staff · Featured

On August 28, 2013, celebrations will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the historic March on Washington.  In consideration of this historic anniversary, Executive Director Maxine Fitzpatrick shared the following poetry from a past PCRI resident:

As Ms. Fitzpatrick recounts, Nadirah Gooden was living in a PCRI property with her family at the time she wrote the poem, which was published in the Oregonian in January 1996.

“She is an extremely talented young lady and to write something like this at the age of 15 is impressive,” Ms. Fitzpatrick added.

For many, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s landmark “I Have a Dream” speech is the most well-known part of the rally.  The Oregon Historical Society, among other organizations, are hosting several events commemorating the 50th Anniversary of Dr. King’s speech and the March on Washington.  Information about their events are listed HERE.

August 2, 2013 · by pcriadmin · Featured

On August 28, 2013, celebrations will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the historic March on Washington.  In consideration of this historic anniversary, Executive Director Maxine Fitzpatrick shared the following poetry from a past PCRI resident:

As Ms. Fitzpatrick recounts, Nadirah Gooden was living in a PCRI property with her family at the time she wrote the poem, which was published in the Oregonian in January 1996.

“She is an extremely talented young lady and to write something like this at the age of 15 is impressive,” Ms. Fitzpatrick added.

For many, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s landmark “I Have a Dream” speech is the most well-known part of the rally.  The Oregon Historical Society, among other organizations, are hosting several events commemorating the 50th Anniversary of Dr. King’s speech and the March on Washington.  Information about their events are listed HERE.

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