Posts Tagged ‘The Big 11’

December 12, 2014 · by Travis Phillips · Featured, PCRI

IMG_4240On Friday, December 12, PCRI welcomed partners and community members to its newest affordable rental home. The new home in Northeast Portland’s Concordia neighborhood is part of a PCRI initiative to enable involuntarily displaced residents of the community to return to neighborhoods they would otherwise be priced out of.

The new home features four bedrooms and two baths. A main floor bedroom and bathroom, as well as all living spaces, are accessible to a resident with mobility impairments. Upstairs, three additional bedrooms and a full bathroom provide space for a larger or extended family.

When PCRI determined that it wasn’t practical to rehabilitate the affordable rental home which was previously at this location, we looked to replace it with a new home that was not only affordable and practical, but also healthy and efficient. The new rental home is part of a larger strategy by PCRI to ensure and expand the availability of affordable rental housing in neighborhoods where community resources are robust, schools are easily accessible, and transit services are frequent and readily available. This home and future developments coming soon aim to mitigate–and when possible, prevent–the forced displacement of long-term residents due to rising rents and gentrification.

IMG_2135As with other homes rehabilitated or newly constructed by PCRI and our contractor partners, this home will benefit from finishes, cabinetry and flooring chosen because for good looks and durability as well as their absence of unhealthy chemicals used in production and finishing. The durable and highly efficient design will not only help the home earn Earth Advantage Platinum certification, but will also help ensure low maintenance and utility costs for PCRI and the home’s residents.

This new construction project, built by Albina Construction, also provides good paying construction jobs for historically underutilized firms. Construction work performed by certified minority-owned, women-owned and emerging small businesses (MWESBs) exceeded 87% of all contracts, based on percentage of overall construction costs. In addition, approximately two-thirds off all work was performed by Section 3 certified workers and businesses, ensuring the economic opportunities of construction benefits low-income residents.

Funding for this project has been provided by Portland Housing Bureau, the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), equity invested by PCRI, and the use of energy-efficiency incentives and planning grants from the Energy Trust of Oregon. Volunteer crews also helped install low-maintenance, drought-tolerant landscaping to minimize water use and maximize the home’s beauty.

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September 16, 2014 · by Travis Phillips · Featured, PCRI

In many inner North and Northeast Portland neighborhoods, affordable housing has become increasingly difficult to find. Families and individuals depending on affordable rents are often faced with the difficult decision to forego basic necessities in order to retain valuable community connections, keep their kids in local schools, or access public transportation. Other long-term Northeast Portland residents find themselves displaced to suburbs and outer Portland neighborhoods in search of affordable rents.

Highland under constructionWhen PCRI determined that one of our affordable rental homes in Portland’s desirable Concordia neighborhood wasn’t practical to rehabilitate, we looked to replace it with a new home that was not only affordable and practical, but also healthy and efficient. The new rental home is part of a larger strategy by PCRI to ensure and expand the availability of affordable rental housing in neighborhoods where community resources are robust, schools are easily accessible, and transit services are frequent and readily available. This home and future developments coming soon aim to mitigate–and when possible, prevent–the forced displacement of long-term residents due to rising rents and gentrification.

The new home, currently under construction, is anticipated to earn Earth Advantage Platinum certification and will serve as a prototype for future developments. It features four bedrooms and two baths. A main floor bedroom and bathroom, as well as all living spaces, are accessible to a resident with mobility impairments. Upstairs, three additional bedrooms and a full bathroom provide space for a larger or extended family.

As with other homes rehabilitated or newly constructed by PCRI and our contractor partners, this home will benefit from finishes, cabinetry and flooring chosen because for good looks and durability as well as their absence of unhealthy chemicals used in production and finishing.

This new construction project, built by Albina Construction, also provides good paying construction jobs for historically underutilized firms. Construction work performed by certified minority-owned businesses exceeds 50% of all subcontracted work through July 2014. In addition, PCRI will team up with Oregon Tradeswomen to offer real-world training opportunities for students to develop carpentry and teamwork skills.

Funding for this project has been provided by Portland Housing Bureau, the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), equity invested by PCRI, and the use of energy-efficiency incentives from the Energy Trust of Oregon.

September 15, 2013 · by Travis Phillips · Featured, PCRI, Rehabilitations

In the fall of 2012, PCRI and Albina Construction began a project to extensively rehabilitate 10 of PCRI’s affordable rental homes, preserving these valuable assets for our community and helping ensure the stability of their neighborhoods. In September, rehabilitation was completed on the final home and new residents moved in, benefiting from the energy-efficiency, health and durability improvements that characterize the work being completed at each house.

The ten homes are located in eight diverse Portland neighborhoods, with each home near parks, community resources and frequent-service public transportation.  New paint, which addressed lead-based paint hazards, makes a dramatic before-and-after comparison.  Additional improvements to these and the other nine rehabilitated homes go much more than skin-deep, including improvements to efficiency and indoor health made according to Home Performance with Energy Star standards.  Testing was performed upon completion of each renovation to ensure the homes are as healthy, safe, and energy-efficient as anticipated.

Many of the new homes will also benefit from kitchens and bathrooms redesigned for better usability.  These newly-rehabilitated rooms will also benefit from cabinetry and flooring chosen not just because they look great, but also for their durability and the absence of unhealthy chemicals used to produce or finish them.

These rehabilitation projects also provide good paying construction jobs as well as training opportunities.  As with prior projects, PCRI teamed up with Oregon Tradeswomen at several of the homes, where students developed their carpentry and teamwork skills building fences, installing floors and creating raised planter beds where the new residents can grow their own healthy produce.

One other home, which is also part of the so-called “Big 11” project, will be deconstructed and the existing two-bedroom structure will be replaced with a newly-built Earth Advantage-certified four-bedroom home.  This new construction home, which is anticipated to be complete in 2014, will feature a wheelchair-accessible main floor bedroom, bathroom, kitchen and living room, plus three upstairs bedrooms to accommodate a larger family.

Funding for these projects has been provided by Portland Housing Bureau, the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and by energy-efficiency incentives from the Energy Trust of Oregon.

For more information on PCRI’s available rentals, check out the Rent a Home page; for more information about the completed rehabilitations, check out the Rehabilitations page.

March 31, 2013 · by Travis Phillips · PCRI, Rehabilitations

One of a handful of affordable rental homes PCRI owns and manages in SE Portland, this house was rehabilitated as part of PCRI’s Big 11 project and will enjoy many improvements that have been completed and are underway in Portland’s Lents neighborhood.  The comprehensive rehab helps ensure the home remains an affordable, healthy and efficient rental property for the long run and helps protect against displacement in the rapidly changing and improving Lents area.  The Big 11 project, funded by Portland Housing Bureau included upgrades and improvements to each of the affordable rental homes.

To ensure a safe, healthy home for new residents, the rehabilitation included abatement of lead paint and asbestos hazards as well as replacement of dated electrical and plumbing systems.  Taking the rehabilitation several steps further, new, energy-efficient doors, windows and upgraded insulation were added.  In addition, a new high-efficiency water heater and gas furnace replaced the old water heater and furnace, and new Energy Star-rated appliances and WaterSense plumbing fixtures, all of which help ensure low utility costs for the residents.  All of the weatherization improvements were performed and tested according to Home Performance with Energy Star standards.

The home also benefits from a new kitchen and bathroom, each of which received new cabinetry and fixtures for improved functionality.  Throughout the home, materials, fixtures and appliances were chosen for durability and ease of maintenance as well as appearance.  Similar logic was used to help ensure healthy indoor spaces: new kitchen and bathroom ventilation fans were installed to exhaust stale air, and low- and no-VOC finishes and materials used throughout the home.  New flooring (much of which was installed by Oregon Tradeswomen students) and fresh paint combined with the new windows ensure ample daylight in each room, creating a welcoming environment and helping to further reduce energy costs.

February 1, 2013 · by Travis Phillips · Rehabilitations

As part of PCRI’s Big 11 project, this home in the Parkrose neighborhood received significant rehabilitation to ensure it remained an affordable, healthy and efficient rental for PCRI residents.  The Big 11 project, funded by Portland Housing Bureau included upgrades and improvements to each of the affordable rental homes.

To ensure a safe, healthy home for new residents, the rehabilitation included abatement of lead paint and asbestos hazards.  To help ensure low utility costs and a comfortable home, new, energy-efficient doors, windows and upgraded insulation were added.  In addition, a new high-efficiency water heater and gas furnace replaced the old water heater and oil furnace.  All of the weatherization improvements were performed and tested according to Home Performance with Energy Star standards.  Similar improvements were made to help ensure healthy indoor spaces and include new kitchen and bathroom ventilation fans installed to exhaust stale air, and low- and no-VOC finishes and materials used throughout the home.

The home also benefits from new flooring, fresh paint, and a new kitchen and bathroom designed for improved functionality.  New Energy Star-rated appliances and water-saving plumbing fixtures complete the renovated kitchen and bathroom, with all materials and appliances chosen for durability and ease of maintenance as well as appearance.  Finally, a dilapidated shed was removed from the rear of the house to open up the large back yard.

A neighbor who had seen the home both before and after the renovations remarked that she wouldn’t have guessed it was the same house if she hadn’t seen it from the street.  (We’ll take that as a compliment of a job well done!)

December 21, 2012 · by Travis Phillips · Rehabilitations

PCRI’s rehabilitation of this single-family home was part of our Big 11 project.  Upgrades and improvements to this and ten other single-family rental homes were made possible by funding from Portland Housing Bureau.

Inside and outside of the house, asbestos hazards were addressed and the home was tested for lead-based paint hazards.  Kitchen and bathroom ventilation fans were upgraded as well, all of which help to ensure a healthy environment for residents.  With ventilation systems improved, insulation systems were checked and the home was tested for areas where drafts and air leaks might occur.  Diligent air sealing and new windows reduced these drafts and leaks by nearly 40%, helping to ensure better efficiency and indoor health according to Home Performance with Energy Star standards.  The new, more efficient windows and an Energy Star-rated refrigerator and hot water heater were installed to further help keep residents’ utility expenses low.

Additional improvements were made to ensure the home was as livable and easy-to-maintain as possible.  The kitchen and bathrooms were completely overhauled with new water-saving fixtures, new flooring was installed, and the home was painted inside and out.

 

December 16, 2012 · by Travis Phillips · Rehabilitations

As part of PCRI’s Big 11 project, this home in the Woodlawn neighborhood was rehabilitated and renovated to ensure it remained an affordable, healthy and efficient rental for PCRI residents.  The Big 11 project, funded by Portland Housing Bureau included upgrades and improvements to each of the affordable rental homes.

New residents in this home will first be greeted with a new front porch and entry stairs.  New, energy-efficient doors and upgraded insulation help create a comfortable interior for residents.  The improvements in insulation, air-tightness (to reduce drafts and heat loss), and efficiency were performed and tested according to Home Performance with Energy Star standards and will help keep utility bills low for the residents.  Similar improvements were made to help ensure healthy indoor spaces and include new kitchen and bathroom ventilation fans installed to exhaust stale air, remediation of lead-based paint and asbestos hazards, and low- and no-VOC finishes and materials used throughout the home.

The home also benefits from new flooring, fresh paint, and a new kitchen, bathroom and laundry area designed for improved functionality.  New Energy Star-rated appliances and water-saving plumbing fixtures complete the renovated kitchen and bathroom, with all materials and appliances chosen for durability and ease of maintenance as well as appearance.  Finally, a dilapidated shed was removed from the rear of the house to open up the large back yard.

November 9, 2012 · by Travis Phillips · Rehabilitations

The rehabilitation and renovation of this home in Portland’s popular Concordia neighborhood was one of eleven single-family rental homes included in PCRI’s Big 11 project.  The project, funded by Portland Housing Bureau included upgrades and improvements to each of the affordable rental homes.

Though not readily evident, significant improvements to efficiency and indoor health were made according to Home Performance with Energy Star standards.  Improved air sealing of the home reduced air leakage by 41%, new energy-efficient windows and doors were installed, and more than 800 square feet of  insulation was added, helping heating systems to work efficiently and aiding residents with energy bills which are as low as possible.  New kitchen and bathroom ventilation fans were also installed to exhaust stale air, lead-based paint and asbestos hazards were addressed, and new low- and no-VOC finishes were used, ensuring a healthy indoor environment for the home’s occupants.

Inside, new flooring, fresh paint, and new and refurbished cabinetry provide a bright and welcoming environment for the residents.  New Energy Star-rated appliances complete the refurbished kitchen, and all materials and appliances have been chosen for durability and ease of maintenance.  Outside, a new driveway and walkway were installed to replace the deteriorated concrete which previously existed.

October 25, 2012 · by Travis Phillips · PCRI, Rehabilitations

The rehabilitation and renovation of this home was part of PCRI’s Big 11 project.  The project, funded by Portland Housing Bureau included upgrades and improvements to 11 single-family rental homes.

The biggest change to this 1905 home is the addition of two upstairs bedrooms in the former attic space.  Thanks to a high roof, two generously-sized bedrooms were added without making any changes to the home’s exterior other than adding windows.  Although one existing main-floor bedroom was lost in order to make room for the stairway, the change allowed for an updated main floor layout including an enlarged family room and a more functional kitchen.  All of the rooms received new flooring, which Oregon Tradeswomen crews helped to install.

Inside and outside of the house, lead-based paint and asbestos hazards were addressed and kitchen and bathroom ventilation was improved.  A fresh coat of no-VOC paint also helps to ensure a healthy environment for residents.  A new Energy Star rated hot water heater and refrigerator were installed and insulation was upgraded help ensure low utility costs. The improvements to efficiency and indoor health were made according to Home Performance with Energy Star standards, with testing performed after the renovation to ensure anticipated results had been achieved.

September 28, 2012 · by Travis Phillips · PCRI, Rehabilitations

PCRI’s rehabilitation of this single-family home was part of our Big 11 project.  Upgrades and improvements to this and ten other single-family rental homes were made possible by funding from Portland Housing Bureau.

Significant improvements to the envelope of this home were a core part of the rehabilitation.  A much-needed new roof was installed to keep the elements out and close attention was paid to improving insulation and air-sealing.  In fact, air leakage (measured by blower-door tests) was reduced by nearly 50%.  A new Energy Star rated furnace, hot water heater and refrigerator were installed to further ensure low utility costs.

Inside and outside of the house, lead-based paint and asbestos hazards were addressed, new flooring was installed, and new ventilation was added, all of which help to ensure a healthy environment for residents.  The improvements to efficiency and indoor health were made according to Home Performance with Energy Star standards, with testing performed after the renovation to ensure anticipated results had been achieved.

Outside, Oregon Tradeswomen crews collaborated with PCRI and Albina Construction to build new fences which will provide privacy from neighbors and create a safer place for children to play.  Tradeswomen-built raised planter beds were also added so residents could grow fresh vegetables.

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