$100,000 Wells Fargo gift to PCRI will provide affordable homes for 22 families 

February 8, 2017 · by pcriadmin · Featured, Pathway 1000, PCRI

Twenty-two low-income families displaced from North and Northeast Portland will be able to purchase a home in their former neighborhood, thanks in part to a $100,000 grant from Wells Fargo Housing Foundation to Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives (PCRI).

PCRI Executive Director Maxine Fitzpatrick (2nd from left) accepts a grant from local Wells Fargo executives, left to right: Andrew Tweedie, Community Affairs officer; Tracy Curtis, Regional President; and Cobi Lewis, Community Development officer. PCRI will use the $100,000 grant to build 22 affordable homes for sale to low-income buyers displaced from N/inner NE Portland

PCRI Executive Director Maxine Fitzpatrick (2nd from left) accepts a grant from local Wells Fargo executives, left to right: Andrew Tweedie, Community Affairs officer; Tracy Curtis, Regional President; and Cobi Lewis, Community Development officer. PCRI will use the $100,000 grant to build 22 affordable homes for sale to low-income buyers displaced from N/inner NE Portland

PCRI will use the grant to help build 22 new homes in North and inner Northeast Portland for purchase by the families. Construction on the homes is expected to start later this year, with all 22 homes completed and sold to qualifying families by the end of 2018. PCRI is estimating the total construction budget will be close to $6 million.

“Helping a family become a homeowner is one of the most effective ways to help them overcome displacement from their historic neighborhoods,” said PCRI Executive Director Maxine Fitzpatrick. “This grant is an important tool to make homes available and affordable for families who want to return and stay in the neighborhoods they once called home.”

The Wells Fargo grant will make homeownership more affordable by helping offset PCRI’s development costs for new homes built on land it owns. The completed homes will be prioritized for sale to households who have been involuntarily displaced or are at risk of displacement from North and inner Northeast Portland.

Families purchasing the homes will receive support from PCRI’s HUD-certified homeownership education and financial education programs.

The 22 homes are part of a larger PCRI initiative: Pathway 1000. The initiative aims to develop 1,000 new homes during the next 10 years, prioritized for residents involuntarily displaced or at risk of displacement from North and inner Northeast Portland.

“This grant is part of our commitment to the community to support the creation of more affordable housing, which is so desperately needed in Portland,” said Wells Fargo Oregon Regional President Tracy Curtis of Portland. “We work in tandem with PCRI and other community-based nonprofits to ensure stability and opportunity for local families.”

One of 56 Grants Nationally 

The $100,000 grant to PCRI was one of 56 neighborhood revitalization grants totaling $6 million that Wells Fargo Housing Foundation gave to nonprofits in 20 states and the District of Columbia through its Priority Markets Program. Since 2009 the program has provided grants totaling more than $42 million to nonprofits in 125 communities.

Grant recipients were selected from requests submitted by local Wells Fargo employees and nonprofits Wells Fargo identified as being in need of extra help with large-scale neighborhood revitalization projects. A recipient must be a nonprofit with a successful history of building or renovating housing for low-to moderate-income homebuyers.

 

About Wells Fargo Housing Foundation 

The Priority Markets Initiatives are administered through the Wells Fargo Housing Foundation. The foundation has stewarded more than $82 million and 4.5 million team member volunteer hours in support of creating affordable housing and community revitalization programs. The foundation has mobilized more than 175,000 volunteers to build or refurbish 3,600 homes in low-to-moderate income communities. More information: www.wellsfargo.com.

 

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